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Lyman sight code

Posted by Mickey Gilbertson on July 23, 2010 at 11:46 AM

There seems to be quite an interest in a listing of the application base codes for the old original Lyman tang sights. I have looked through many vintage Lyman catalogs, and I have compiled the listing that follows. I am pretty sure it is complete for the time period it covers, but if anyone has any additions or corrections, please feel free to offer them up (I may have inadvertently missed something). Many "special" tang sights to fit rifles of unusual configuration in the tang area were also made, and I will not try to address those. Lyman also made a number of sights to mount on the cocking pieces of various military rifles. These tang sights do not have published application codes as far as I have been able to determine.

These are the several variations/types of tang sights that were made, and I have tried to briefly summarize them as follows;

1. No. 1 Combination Tang Sight (first variation) – patented Jan. 28, 1879. This sight has a thick base and a knurled thumbscrew on the right side of the upright pivot. The real early sights did not have the flip-down peep window, but that feature was incorporated before being replaced in 1884 with the Second Variation.

2. No. 1 Combination Tang Sight Second Variation – patented May 6, 1884. This sight has both the JAN. 28, ’79 and MAY 6, ’84 patent dates stamped on the base of the elevation upright. The knurled screw was replaced with a hairspring that allowed the elevation stem to be locked in the upright position by a spring loaded detent. It was replaced in 1905 by the No. 1A

3. No. 1A Combination Tang Sight Third Variation – patented July 25, 1905. The “A” suffix indicates the addition of the locking lever on the left side of the upright pivot. This sight was in production until 1955.

4. No. 2 Combination Tang Sight – introduced in 1894 and it was intended for Match and Gallery rifles. It is identical to the No. 1 Second Variation except that it has a screw in aperture disk instead of the flip-down peep. Several different aperture disks were available (each with a different diameter peep hole). The larger the outside diameter (OD) of the disk, the smaller the diameter of the peep hole. I believe that seven different sized disks were made (from 3/8” to 1” OD)

5. No. 2A Combination Tang Sight Second Variation – introduced simultaneously with the No. 1A, and is the same the No. 2 except for the locking lever.

6. No. 15 Windgauge Tang Sight – patented August 23, 1887. This was the first sight that could not be folded down like the No. 1 and No. 2 Tang sights, and because of that fact, it was a poor seller and was discontinued in 1906.

7. No. 29 Windgauge Tang Sight – patented March 6, 1900. This sight has a square stem piece, and could not be folded down like the No. 1 and No. 2 Tang sights. It was discontinued in 1903 due to complaints by shooters of frequent damage to the sight (due to not being able to fold it down).

8. No. 101 and 102 Range Control Tang Sight – patented March 9, 1915 and April 18, 1916. These were the first sights to offer click adjustable elevation. The elevation thimble had ten graduations (marked 0, 2, 4, and 8 with a detent position between each mark). The No. 101 had a flip-down peep, while the No. 102 utilized a screw in aperture disk.

9. No. 103 Windgauge Tang Sight – introduced in 1916. This sight is the crème of the crop. It features a micrometer (half-minute per click) elevation and windage adjustment, and uses the screw in aperture disks. It is highly sought after by serious target shooters. It has the same locking lever as the No. 1A and 2A, and was discontinued in 1955.

10. No. 47 Windgauge stem. I do not know when it was introduced, but it was made to replace the standard elevation stem on the No. 1, 1A, 2, and 2A Tang sights. It allowed for very precise windage adjustment by use of a thumbscrew (1/4 turn changed the impact ½” at 100 yards with a 30” sight base), and it uses a screw in aperture disk like the No. 2 or 2A. If a complete sight was ordered with this feature, it was referred to as a No. 52A.

The following list is what I was able to dig up… I hope that it helps to clear up any remaining questions that you may have.

LYMAN BASE CODE APPLICATIONS, 1878 - 1955

****************************************

AT - Remington Autoloading Rifles, Models 8 & 81

B - Marlin Model '92, .32 caliber, Hopkins & Allen, Ballard

C - Colt, .22 caliber, Remington No. 6

D - Winchester Model '94, .32/40, .38/55 calibers, Winchester Model '92

DA - Winchester Model '94, .25/35, .30/30 & .32 Special calibers, Model 53, .25/20 & .32/20 calibers, Model 55, .30/30 caliber, Models 64 & 65

DE - Standard Repeating Rifle

E - Marlin Model '89, Marlin Model '94, .25/20, .32/20, .38/40 & .44/40 calibers

F - Stevens Favorite, No. 418 & No. 418 1/2

G - Stevens Models 65 & 66

H - Marlin Model '92, .22 caliber, & Marlin Models '97, 39 & 39A

HP - Stevens No. 425

I - Winchester Model '76

J - Marlin Model '93, .32/40 & .38/55 calibers

JA - Marlin Model '93, .25/36, .30/30, .32 H.P.S., .32/40 H.P.S. & .38/55 H.P.S. calibers

JB - Marlin Model 27

JM - Marlin Model '95

K - Marlin Models 18 & 25

KM - Marlin Models 20, 29, 37, 47

L - Iver Johnson Models X & 2X

N - Winchester Model '86, all calibers except .33

NI - Winchester Model '86, .33 caliber

NP - Stevens New Model Pocket Rifle

P - Stevens Ideal, Marksman, No. 414, No. 417 & No. 417 1/2

PC - Stevens Crack Shot

Q - Quackenbush

R - Remington No. 3, all calibers except .22

RA - Remington No. 2, Remington No. 3, .22 caliber & Remington No. 5

RP - Stevens Reliable Pocket Rifle

RS - Remington No. 7

R12 - Remington Repeater, Models 12 & 121

R14 - Remington Repeater, Models 14 & 141

R16 - Remington Autoloading Rifle, Model 16, .22 caliber

R24 - Remington Autoloading Rifle, Models 24 & 241, .22 caliber

R25 - Remington Repeater, Model 25

S - Winchester Single Shot (Model 1885), all calibers except .22 and .30/40

SA - Savage Model '99, .25/35, .30/30, .300, .303, .32/40, .32/40 H.P.S., .22 H.P. & .250/3000 calibers

SB - Winchester Single Shot (Model 1885), .22 & .30/40 calibers

SC - Winchester Model 87 Winder Musket

SE - Savage Model 1905

SH - Savage Model '99, .38/55 & .38/55 H.P.S. calibers

SJ - Savage "Junior"

SL - Winchester Models 1905, 1907 & 1910 Self-Loading Rifles

SM - Savage Models 1903, 1909, 1912, 1914, 25 & 29, Meriden Models 10 & 15, Mossberg Model K & Stevens Model 75

SN - Savage Model 1919 .22 NRA & Savage Sporter, .22 caliber

SS - Savage 1922 Sporter, 1923-A Sporter, .22 caliber

ST - Stevens Repeater No. 80

SV - Stevens Repeater Nos. 70 & 71

U - Remington No. 4

W - Winchester Model '73

WA - Winchester Models 1903 & 63

WF - Winchester Model 52

WM - Winchester .22 Musket

WS - Winchester Models 1890, 1906, 62 & 62A

W61 - Winchester Model 61

X - Express (English)

XA - Winchester Model 1902

XS - Winchester Models 1904, 56, 57, 59 & 60

Y - Maynard

Categories: Old Gun Sights

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14 Comments

Reply Doug Frazier
2:14 PM on August 4, 2011 
What tang sight was used on Winchester 1905 SLR? 3 holes; 2 in tang 7/8 inch apart; 1 in wood behind tang 1.50 " from most forward tang hole. About 1/8" across & about 3/8 " deep. Don't know thread pitch. Would like to order one from Lyman or Marbles if still available. Thanks for any help. A great old rifle!
Reply rutgerssmith
10:18 AM on January 12, 2012 
I have a sight that seems to be a late 48 but with the stamped clip on index plate thats marked LH Its a right side mount for a round receiver like a Mauser maybe I'd post a picture here but I'm not sure how with this web site.
Reply Neil Waters
8:51 AM on March 26, 2012 
Thanks for the info. Was after information on the Lyman 52A that is on a rifle being offered for sale. My guess it is a 1912 vintage single shot take down winchester and I had only one reference but did not show any picture of the sight and referred to it only as a Lyman 47.
I do agree with your comments on the Lyman 103. It came on a Winder musket and it's a nice piece of work.
Thanks again
Reply Travis Campbell
7:15 PM on June 29, 2012 
I have a sight marked

PAT JAN29.79-MAY6.84

and is stamped with a "V" on the underside of the base.
I do not know its intended application, but am trying to find screws to fit it(preferably in 10-28 thread) any ideas?
Reply James
9:59 PM on November 23, 2012 
I have a functional 30 1/2 Savage Combination Tang Peep Sight (SA). What is its value?
Reply Robert
12:06 AM on January 12, 2013 
I have a vintage Lyman 1A with the locking lever on the side. (sight has the Pat. July 25, '05 and a "D" on the underside bottom plate.) It is mounted on a antique 38-55 Win Mode 1894 I just purchase. Question I have is: The sight moves up and down freely, but the locking lever does not move at all - so I'm wondering, in what direction or motion should I try to loosen it up, or what is the proper way to apply the lock?
Reply Michael Dahl
11:21 PM on January 12, 2013 
what ladder sight has code
LS?
Reply Mickey Gilbertson
9:42 PM on January 20, 2013 
James says...
I have a functional 30 1/2 Savage Combination Tang Peep Sight (SA). What is its value?
Reply Mickey Gilbertson
9:43 PM on January 20, 2013 
Travis Campbell says...
I have a sight marked

PAT JAN29.79-MAY6.84

and is stamped with a "V" on the underside of the base.
I do not know its intended application, but am trying to find screws to fit it(preferably in 10-28 thread) any ideas?
Reply William Reidinger
11:19 PM on March 14, 2013 
On a Lyman 103 windage sight. Sight code B the hole spacing is for Stevens 1 1/2 inches
Reply Mickey Gilbertson
11:42 PM on March 14, 2013 
Travis Campbell says...
I have a sight marked

PAT JAN29.79-MAY6.84

and is stamped with a "V" on the underside of the base.
I do not know its intended application, but am trying to find screws to fit it(preferably in 10-28 thread) any ideas?
Reply Dart McGregor
3:35 PM on November 18, 2013 
Did Lyman NOT mark any of their sights
Reply Mickey
4:06 PM on November 18, 2013 
Most of all Lyman sights were stamped but I have found a few early sights that were not. Redfield sights were bad to mark the box only I guess to save money, common since is needed to figure out what sight you have.

Thanks you for your question
Reply Jamesz
1:56 PM on December 29, 2013 
James says...
I have a functional 30 1/2 Savage Combination Tang Peep Sight (SA). What is its value?


James, if you still have this, I am interested in it. Please contact me with pic & info of it.